Latest on International Development Cooperation

UN Millennium Development Goal target to reduce malaria burden achieved

UN Millennium Development Goal target to reduce malaria burden achieved19 November 2015 – With roughly six weeks left under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – a set of eight universally-agreed goals adopted in 2000 to rid the world of extreme poverty and disease by 2015 – global leaders, diplomats and health experts are gathering at the UN today in New York to celebrate the progress made against one of the world’s leading killers: malaria.

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership poses a grave threat to sustainable development

Trans Pacific Partnership poses a grave threat to sustainable developmentThis month’s long-awaited release of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) text was the result of years of negotiations on trade ties between nations around the Pacific Rim.
Some six weeks earlier, another set of deliberations came to an end as the United Nations unveiled its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which aim to eradicate poverty and reduce inequality by addressing critical issues such as food security, health care, access to education, clean and affordable water, clean energy, and climate action.

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Cities and the Sustainable Development Goals

Cities and the Sustainable Development GoalsThis past September, as global influencers throughout the international community gathered at the United Nations for the 2015 General Assembly, something bigger than networking and negotiating took place during this season’s “Super Bowl of Diplomacy.”

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Missing link in new Sustainable Development Goals

Missing link in new Sustainable Development GoalsThe SDGs are an inter governmentally agreed set of targets relating to international development. They come after the millennium development goals which ended just recently and build the sustainable development agenda that was finalised by member states during the Rio + 20 Summit.The SDGs were first formally discussed at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development held in Rio De Janeiro in June 2012 (Rio +20).

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Ban warns against cutting development aid to finance refugee crisis

Ban warns against cutting development aid to finance refugee crisisThe United Nation (UN) Chief has warned against proposed cuts in development assistance from some of the world’s wealthiest countries primarily over the refugee crisis facing large parts of Europe.

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About The Project

Supported by the Department for International Development (DFID) UK, this 3 year project focuses on deepening the understanding of the international politics of development diplomacy, including the key political drivers that influence and shape development policy internationally and the impact this has on South Africa as an emerging development assistance partner.

Key Themes

This project considers three key areas:

  1. The development of the South African Development Partnership Agency (SADPA);
  2. Trilateral development partnerships; and
  3. Multilateral development cooperation.
Aims and Objectives of The Project

The aims of this project include:

  • improving the understanding of the current transition taking place within multilateral development cooperation in both the geo-political North and South;
  • understanding the role of multilateral development cooperation for South Africa’s foreign policy and international engagement in the short, medium, and long-term;
  • review potential opportunities as well as obstacles in engaging in international development assistance
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Contact details
Address:   3rd Floor Robert Sobukwe Building
263 Nana Sita Street
Pretoria
South Africa

PO Box 14349
The Tramshed
0126
    E-mail:    info@igd.org.zaThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
      Telephone:   +2712 337 6082
      Fax:   +2786 212 9442
 
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